Best Practices

NI 43-101 Disclosure

The information on this web site includes certain “Forward-Looking Statements” within the meaning of securities exchange regulation. All statements regarding potential mineralization and reserves, exploration results, and future plans and objectives of Regulus Resources Inc. are Forward-Looking Statements that involve various risks and uncertainties. There can be no assurance that such statements will prove to be accurate and actual results and future events could differ materially from those anticipated in such statements. Important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from Regulus Resources Inc. expectations are disclosed under the heading “Risk Factors” and elsewhere in Regulus Resources Inc. documents filed from time to time with the securities regulatory authorities.

All of Regulus Resources Inc.’s exploration programs and the related disclosure of information of technical or scientific nature are prepared by, or prepared under the direct supervision of John E. Black, Regulus’ CEO, who is the Qualified Person as defined in NI 43-101.

Sampling Methods

Surface Rock Chip Samples

Surface rock chip and grab samples are collected by Regulus field-personnel using hammer and chisels. Rock chips are immediately placed into cloth or plastic sample bags, secured with a plastic zip tie, and labelled with a unique Regulus sample number. Most of the rock chip samples are semi-continuous chip channel samples and are typically two (2) metres in length, but this depends upon the nature of the outcrop and/or road cut being sampled. The bagged samples are then transported to the nearest Regulus field camp, by Regulus personnel, where they were stored in a secure area pending shipment to a certified laboratory sample prep facility.

Talus Debris (Float) Samples

Talus debris or float samples are collected in those areas of low outcrop density or cover. Many of the areas in which Regulus works are covered with a thin veneer of rock talus or float; however this float material has not been transported very far and is basically a result of in situ weather and erosion of the bedrock. Therefore, the objective of collecting this type of sample is to test if it would be useful in the identification of thinly buried/covered mineralization.

Trench Samples

Trenches are typically excavated to bedrock with an average depth of 0.5-2.0 metres and a width of 1-1.5 metres, using a large excavator. If bedrock is not encountered within approximately 2 metres, then for safety reasons the trench is discontinued. All loose rock is cleared away from the floor of the trench to expose a clean smooth bedrock surface. Sample intervals, typically two (2) metres in length, but variable depending upon the nature of the bedrock, are then marked by an Regulus geologist.

Channel samples are then cut with a portable, gas-powered, water-cooled, diamond channel saw. Two parallel cuts are made approximately 5 cm apart and to a depth of 3 to 4 cm. Samples are then extracted by Regulus field personnel with the aid of a hammer and chisel; with emphasis on constant sample volume for the length of the sample interval. Rock chips are immediately placed into a plastic sample bag, secured with a plastic zip tie, and labelled with a unique Regulus sample number. The sample site is then marked with a metal tag inscribed with the unique Regulus sample number. The bagged samples are then transported to the nearest Regulus field camp, by Regulus personnel, where they were stored in a secure area pending shipment to a certified laboratory sample prep facility.

Reverse Circulation Drill Samples

Reverse circulation drill samples are collected immediately at the drill-hole site. Reverse circulation drilling is completed with dry conditions; however if water is encountered, the drilling method is converted to diamond drill core to insure sample integrity. Dry drill sample cuttings are collected in a cyclone over a two (2) metre sample interval and then passed through a riffle splitter to sequentially reduce the sample size. One-eighth of the sample (9-10 kg) is then placed into a pre-labelled plastic bag, sealed with a plastic zip tie, and identified with a unique Regulus sample number. The bagged samples are then transported to the nearest Regulus camp, by Regulus personnel, where they are stored in a secure area pending shipment to a certified laboratory sample prep facility.

The remaining seven-eighths of the sample are then stored in a large, labelled plastic bag at the drill site for future reference. The reference samples from mineralized intervals are transported to the nearest Regulus camp, by Regulus personnel. A small representative sample of the rock cuttings from each interval is placed into a plastic sample tray for subsequent geological logging of the hole by a Regulus geologist.

Diamond Drilling Samples

Diamond drill core is collected at the drill site under the supervision of Regulus employees where RQD (Rock Quality Designation) measurements are taken before the core is transported by truck to the core logging facility in camp. After geologically logging the core, the samples are typically sampled over a two (2) metre sample interval unless the geologist determines the presence of an important geological contact. The core is cut with a diamond saw blade with half the sample retained in the core box for future reference and the other half (9-10 kg) placed into a pre-labelled plastic bag, sealed with a plastic zip tie, and identified with a unique Regulus sample number. The bagged samples are then stored in a secure area pending shipment to a certified laboratory sample prep facility.

QA/QC Procedures

Regulus has implemented a quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) program to ensure the reliability of all litho-geochemical sampling and analyzes of both surface samples and drill samples from all of its projects.

All samples are shipped directly to certified laboratory sample prep facility in sealed bags with unique Regulus identification numbers. Samples are prepared and analysed only at internationally certified labs (e.g., international standards ISO 9001:2000 and ISO 17025:1999), which control their data quality with the use of reagent blanks, reference materials, and replicates. All lab control results pertinent to Regulus Resources Inc. data, such as standards, blanks, and duplicates must be reported Regulus.

In Addition, Regulus independently inserts certified control standards, coarse field blanks, and duplicates into the sample stream to monitor data quality. These standards are inserted “blindly” to the laboratory in the sample sequence. Regulus knows the values that should be determined for these standard samples, but the laboratory does not, and the standards act as an independent test of the laboratory’s accuracy of analysis. Regulus inserts a minimum of 5% control samples in all sample batches and 10% control samples for drilling samples. The results of all data quality controls are carefully reviewed prior to the public release of any data.

Finally, Regulus periodically performs “surprise” laboratory visits to inspect cleanliness and assess overall lab performance.